10 Most Affordable College Towns in Oregon

Thanks to its widespread outdoorsy culture and beautiful natural scenery, Oregon attracts college students looking to experience four years of living in one of America’s most stunning states. Unfortunately for college students on a budget, Oregon is also one of America’s most expensive states. That’s why we’ve done some research to find the 10 most affordable college towns in Oregon by taking into consideration both cost of living and quality of life.

Methodology
Our editors used Wikipedia to make a list of every college town in Oregon, then used Sperling’s Best Places to rank them on general affordability. To figure out which college towns are most affordable, we looked at costs for housing, food, healthcare, transportation, and utilities. We compared these to the national average. We also considered features like amenities, crime rates, public transportation, and overall quality of life before narrowing our list down to the 10 most affordable college towns in Oregon.

1. Klamath Falls


Oregon Institute of Technology
Cost of Living: 4% lower than the national average; 22% lower than the state average
Klamath Falls, home to Oregon Institute of Technology, is a picturesque town ideal for those who enjoy getting outdoors. Nicknamed “Oregon’s City of Sunshine,” Klamath Falls is located a mere hop from Crater Lake, making popular hiking, mountain biking, and fishing, among other outdoor adventures. And, of course, such a low cost of living leaves budget-conscious students with plenty to enjoy other things. Housing here is only about 80% of the national norm, while food and entertainment costs also average lower.

2. La Grande


Eastern Oregon University
Cost of Living: 6% lower than the national average; 24% lower than the state average
Located just east of the Blue Mountain, La Grande got its name because one of its early French settlers, Charles Dause, frequently described the area’s natural beauty with the phrase “la Grande!” Today, this pretty small town is home to Eastern Oregon University. Residents and students alike enjoy La Grande’s extremely affordable cost of living, which averages well below both the national and state averages. While some cost categories, such as healthcare and transportation, actually average above the U.S. norm, others such as housing, average well below. Students determined to live off campus in La Grande can expect to rent a one-bedroom apartment for approximately $500 per month — a steal!

3. Salem


Willamette University; Corban University
Cost of Living: 8% higher than the national average; 10% lower than the state average
Salem may be the capital of Oregon, but this town of 165,000 people enjoys a certain small, college-town feel. Home to both Willamette University and the Christian Corban University, Salem offers its residents a friendly and walkable downtown area and lots of surrounding farmland. Though Salem’s cost of living is still about 8% higher than the national norm, it’s easily one of Oregon’s more affordable addresses. Salem’s highest cost-of-living categories include housing (12% higher than the U.S. average) and healthcare (15% higher than the U.S. average), while its lowest categories include utilities (5% lower than the national average) and food (4% higher than the national average).

4. Monmouth


Western Oregon University
Cost of Living: 10% higher than the national average; 8% lower than the state average
Located not too far from the state capital of Salem, Monmouth is a quiet and family-friendly town that also happens to be the home of Western Oregon University. Though Monmouth’s cost of living averages about 10% higher than the rest of the United States, it remains very affordable compared to the rest of the state. Housing in Monmouth is easily the most expensive cost-of-living category, with prices averaging about 14% higher than the national average. Utilities costs, meanwhile, average lower than the norm, while costs for healthcare, transportation, and entertainment all average about 10% higher than the national average.

5. Eugene


University of Oregon; Northwest Christian University; New Hope Christian College; Gutenberg College
Cost of Living: 11% higher than the national average; 7% lower than the state average
With more than four colleges calling it home, Eugene is a college town known for its fun, young, and lively atmosphere. Students have access to all of Eugene’s favorite bars and restaurants, the former of which are especially popular considering the Willamette Valley’s reputation for breweries. Best of all, students living in Eugene can afford the occasional night out thanks to the college town’s affordability. Food here averages about 7% less than the national average, while costs for healthcare, housing, utilities, transportation, and entertainment all also over just above or below the norm.

6. McMinnville


Linfield College
Cost of Living: 17% higher than the national average; 9% lower than the state average
The affordable (by West Coast standards) town of McMinnville has a ton to offer its full-time residents and the students of Linfield College. Such offerings include the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum (and its waterpark with a waterslide jutting out from a 747 jumbo jet!). It has a full calendar of fun festivals and other social events, an impressive local wine scene, and a pedestrian-friendly downtown perfect for eating and shopping. Though McMinnville’s cost of living is higher than many towns on our list, much of that has to do with the fact that housing here is about 30% higher than the national norm. A one-bedroom apartment, for example, would set one back about $870 per month.

7. Newberg


George Fox University
Cost of Living: 22% higher than the national average; 4% higher than the state average
Located not too far from Portland, Newberg is home to a campus of George Fox University. Living here isn’t exactly a bargain, but the town offers its residents attractive scenery, a pedestrian-friendly downtown area, and a vibrant arts and culture scene. Much of Newberg’s higher cost of living is the result of housing costs that average 44% higher than the national norm. Fortunately, these higher costs are [somewhat] tempered by the costs for utilities, entertainment, food, transportation, and healthcare.

8. Corvallis


Oregon State University
Cost of Living: 26% higher than the national average; 8% higher than the state average
Home to Oregon State University, Corvallis is well known as a family-friendly town. The economy here is strong, thanks in part to the local university. The quality of living is high because of Corvallis’s easy access to the beach (an hour away), the mountains (1.5 hours away), and Portland (two hours away). Though Corvallis’s cost of living is a tad higher than some of the other places on our list, most of that cost difference is due to housing. Housing costs in Corvallis average 67% higher than the national average, and about 24% higher than the state average. Fortunately, other cost-of-living categories such as entertainment, utilities, healthcare, and food all average right on par with the national norm.

9. Forest Grove


Pacific University
Cost of Living: 26% higher than the national average; 8% higher than the state average
Forest Grove is home to Oregon’s first chartered university, Pacific University. Therefore, Forest Grove is actually the state’s oldest college town — and its best, according to the Portland Business Journal. Though the town is located fewer than 30 miles from Portland, it boasts its own impressive number of great eateries, bike-friendly roads, breweries, shops, and entertainment. Plus, Forest Grove is conveniently located less than one hour’s drive from both the beach and Mt. Hood. Its cost of living is higher than both the country and the state averages, but much of that has to do with housing costs. For example, a one bedroom in Forest Grove rents for an average of $820 per month, about $200 less than in Portland.

10. Ashland


Southern Oregon State University
Cost of Living: 34% higher than the national average; 17% higher than the state average
Although it’s home to Southern Oregon State University, the cute little college town of Ashland may perhaps be better known for its world-famous annual Shakespeare festival. Residents living in Ashland have plenty of access to arts and culture. There’s also myriad outdoor recreational activities possible in the nearby mountains and forests. Ashland’s cost of living averages about 34% higher than the national average. As is the case with most college towns, the biggest cost difference is housing. At 105% higher than the national norm, housing can be a bit of a challenge for college students. For example, a one-bedroom apartment in Ashland averages $650 per month, while a two-bedroom averages about $870. Fortunately, Ashland’s other cost-of-living categories average much closer to the typical U.S. costs, with a couple categories (utilities and entertainment) even averaging lower than usual.

So what is Oregon’s most expensive college town? That would be Portland, which has a cost of living about 40% higher than the national average.